I only play one video game. It’s open ended and will never finish. Each year they bring out an update but I don’t queue up at the store or place a pre-order online to get it. I wait until it’s half price (around 6 month before the next update) before buying it. I enjoy playing that game, it relaxes me and gives me a momentary sense of achievement. I have realised that the time I enjoy it the most is when I can grab a quiet moment with no other tasks to do and play the game for a short 20 minute burst. When I have a free Saturday afternoon, I sometimes start playing out of boredom. When I play out of boredom, the game is fun to begin with but it quickly loses it’s effect (my brain has got it’s momentary buzz and playing for hours more won’t make me feel any better). Somehow I keep playing but the fun just isn’t there (the addictive nature of games). After about an hour I generally stop and find something else to do. So it’s those snatched moments where I really enjoy playing the game. Especially if I’ve been denied playing the game for a few days (by general life tasks and more urgent family things). If I’m on a run of playing it, I sometimes think about when I’m next going to play but when an opportunity comes I always make sure there’s not something I should be doing instead (preparing dinner, doing some washing, tidying the apartment, working on a side project). It’s almost like I’ve realised that playing the game at every opportunity won’t bring me happiness. I know that the gameplay achieves nothing, it doesn’t advance my life in any way. But I still enjoy that moment of calm when I hear the beep of the console turning on as I warm the gamepad to grab 20 minutes of endorphin buzz. I’m 32 years old but when I play I’m acting out a story in my head, using the game as a mechanism to play out my inner script. When the game is on, I’m a child again with no worries or stresses in the world.

Matt Reid

Lead Software Architect. Java, Node.js and TypeScript enthusiast.

drei01 Matthew_Reid


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